Top 3 Haunted Places in Maine

Grab a lobster roll with your friends and cruise through the dense Maine wilderness. If you’re looking for more of an adventure away from the traditional tourist traps of Maine, be sure to add the following locations to your road trip itinerary.

DISCLAIMER: Remember to receive proper permission before entering buildings or facilities that are clearly marked as private property.

The Bowdoin Cemetery in the Pit

A young woman in the 1800s allegedly practiced witchcraft and was sentenced to death by hanging from the townspeople in the Bowdoin area. This cemetery is unmarked and easily passed alongside the back Maine road it resides upon. Buried around a circle of trees it seems even nature itself is afraid of what may lay below the soil. Many of the cemetery plots are destroyed, however, what frightens most explorers, is not the mass amount of vandalism, but the alleged witch’s grave itself. The soil is soft, almost freshly turned, as if someone recently was digging to find her corpse. If local legends are true, her grave has a curse attached to those who step in, and especially dig into, the burial site. The Bowdoin cemetery is definitely an eerie, and interesting stop for your next journey through Maine.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The North Manchester Meeting House

Constructed in 1793, this church still serves the small town of Manchester, ME. However, the building itself brings less attention than the cemetery surrounded by old stone walls. Within one of these stones, imprints what’s known as The Devil’s Footprint. Locals claim during the construction of the church a worker stood atop this stubborn boulder swearing he’d sell his soul to the devil if that rock could be moved. The next day, the rock was moved and the construction worker had disappeared. It’s easy to miss the inexplicable imprint while combing the quiet and vacant cemetery grounds. The legend of ‘The Devil’s Footprint’ is one to worth viewing on your next Maine road trip.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Central Maine Sanatorium

Originally titled ‘The Chase Memorial Sanatorium’, it opened in 1910 as a hospital to treat tuberculosis patients. As the rate of tuberculosis cases rose, so did the need for treatment. Extending the intimate hospital setting, construction of wooden buildings took place in 1912 but was unfortunately lost in a fire one year later. The hospital quickly bounced back rebuilding with the addition of a surgical wing and children’s unit.

At the time, there were three Maine (pun not intended) treatment centers for patients with tuberculosis. Western Maine Sanatorium, Central Maine Sanatorium, and Northern Maine Sanatorium. In more southern regions of the state, patients who seemed to be responding to treatment and were more likely to be cured were admitted or transferred to Western Maine Sanatorium in Hebron, ME. Otherwise, they remained or were transferred to Central Maine Sanatorium in Fairfield, ME. In northern regions of the state patients with tuberculosis were admitted to the Northern Maine Sanatorium in Presque Isle, ME. The Central Maine Sanatorium closed in 1970 with a portion of its rooms remaining open as the Pleasant Hill Nursing Home eventually closing in 2001.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

If you’re looking for more be sure to follow me on Instagram @iMarrowsJ or check out my page on Haunted History. Did I miss something? Contact Me or comment below.

Profile Description

© John Marrows All Rights Reserved

In 1878 alongside the Little Colorado River, a Navajo encampment was attacked by a collection of Apache raiders. The planned attack by the Apache left most Navajo men, women, and children dead. As the Apache were looting the encampment, they came across three women whose lives were spared but were taken as prisoners.  Navajo leaders eventually received word of the attacks and they sent 25 men in retaliation. Tracking the Apaches and obstructing the borders to the region, the Navajo men took their strategic approach with caution.

Unfortunately, their efforts quickly failed as the trails vanished from volcanic cinder flowing through a nearby river. News swiftly spread that yet another Navajo encampment had been raided alerting them that the Apache may still be in close proximity. Vanguards were again deployed to search the surrounding area. Amongst this crew, two were requested to explore the short arm of Canyon Diablo. During their hunt, they were alarmed by an odd breeze of hot air coming from underground. Carefully approaching, they discovered a cavern beneath them able to shelter the Apache raiding party and their horses. With the knowledge of the Apaches whereabouts, the two scouts returned to their tribe to prepare a retaliation attack.

After murdering the unsuspecting Apache guards, the Navajo gathered brush, kindling, and driftwood then proceeded to light a fire on the canyon floor right outside the entrance of the cave. As the smoke began pouring into their cavern hideaway, the Apache began to slit their horse’s throats and used the blood plus what little water they had in attempts to put out the flames. Begging for mercy, the Apache began to seal the entrance with the slaughtered corpses of their steeds. The Navajo people questioned the status of the three women the Apache had kidnapped and when there was no response, they began firing their guns into the cave. Piercing the flesh barriers adding fuel to the fire, the Apaches death songs faded as they all met their ill-fated ends.

As silence rained through the charred carcasses, the Navajo made a clearing, stripping the 42 Apache raiders of their goods and valuables. Since that tragic day in history, no Apache has approached the cave nor considered raiding the Navajo people. Local tribes would warn would-be pioneers of the caves lethal accounts claiming the land surrounding that area was forever cursed. Settlers passed this as superstition but pioneers later reported hearing unexplained groans and footsteps outside their cabins. It seems the folklore and legends that followed the massacre easily left an impact on the pioneer’s that later settled on those very grounds.

Consider helping me deliver more content: https://www.patreon.com/imarrowsj

WalkwayWalkway LandscapeRubbled RunwayCanyon KasmDeath Cave EntranceDeath CaveClose-Up

© John Marrows All Rights Reserved

Addressed in the 1977 book, this home was built in 1927 at 112 Ocean Ave. The book was focused on the fictional happenings after DeFeo Jr. relentlessly murdered his family. Since the murders, the home has been owned by five different families. In 2010, the waterfront home of three-stories sold for an impressive $950,000. The latest research states the home was again listed in 2016 for $850,000 which included five bedrooms, a basement unit, and three and a half bathrooms.⠀

NOTE: This is a home. People DO reside at this residence. If you’re a fan of the book/films and are planning a visit, please be respectful of the grounds and the family that lives there.

Consider helping me deliver more content: https://www.patreon.com/imarrowsj

Featured

© John Marrows All Rights Reserved

Originally dubbed Canyon Padre Trading Post, Twin Arrows Trading Post was put up in the 1940’s motivated by the nearby popular Old Route 66 stop, Two Guns. Tourists and venturers were able to purchase fuel, Route 66 souvenirs, and perhaps enjoy a meal at the attached cafe and diner. Two iconic wooden arrows were erected within the parking lot to lead the way for sightseers and tourists alike. Unfortunately, the construction of a nearby interstate combined with the increasing disinterest of kitschy roadside stops led to the abandonment of the Twin Arrows Trading Post in 1995. The graffiti-ridden rubbled grounds are currently owned by the Twin Arrows Navajo Casino whose most recent refurbishment was of the historic arrows in 2009, still standing to mark this forgotten roadside attraction. No further plans have been announced to reconstruct or reopen the Twin Arrows Trading Post.

Consider helping me deliver more content: https://www.patreon.com/imarrowsj

Twin Arrows Trading PostStation w ArrowsArrows w MountainCafeBack EntranceRestroomYou're The Worst

© John Marrows All Rights Reserved

Built in 1874, the site was originally the city of Phoenix’s first school. Serving the community until 1916 where it was shortly exchanged to become one of the city’s most well-known hotels. Opening its doors on March 28th, 1928, Hotel San Carlos was often touted to hold the finest accommodations in the southwest; including the first high-rise in Phoenix with air conditioning. Less than two months of the hotel’s inception a young woman, Leone Jensen, checked in to her third-floor stay. Traveling across the country, Leone was on a journey to marry the man of her dreams, who, legend states, happened to be a bellhop at another hotel. Unfortunately for her, he no longer felt the love they once shared and this was something she could not bear. In the final hours of her second night, Leone drafted several letters on the hotel’s parchment addressed to a variety of suitors. Out of the many letters she had written, the lengthiest was directed towards an undertaker in Los Angelos stating requests and plans for her funeral.

“Bury me in my tan dress and tan high-heeled slippers,” she wrote.

“Organ music above all things. And can you arrange for two girls to sing, as I have never loved harmony, ‘Nearer My God to Thee.” Leone requested.

Good-by and good luck. Think of me kindly.” she signed.

Much later that evening, around 02:45AM, Leone made her way to the roof of Hotel San Carlos donning her evening gown. Gazing over central avenue she eventually stepped towards the edge, took one last step, thus plunging herself to the sidewalk below.

Hotel guests and passerby’s claim to see Leone repeat her dive from time to time, stating they’ve witnessed a woman in an evening gown on the roof. Other stories claim her lover was abusive and pushed her in a rage, some say the hotel was constructed over an ancient Hohokam village and the grounds were cursed from the very beginning.

Consider helping me deliver more content: https://www.patreon.com/imarrowsj

86970417_639039986666011_8247505074352291840_n86976110_2620998164809666_1142879892543635456_n87061589_2769098316517557_3744425649125720064_n

© John Marrows All Rights Reserved

Opened in 1978 on 315 Travis, Treebeards lives within the Baker Travis building, which is the second oldest building in Houston, Texas. Although the reviews mentioned great food and a lively bar atmosphere, reports of cold spots and a bean cooks description of a full body apparition are what caught my teams eye. Making it a perfect lunch stop on my travels through Houston.

The bean cook describes what could’ve been Mr. Danowitz, an elderly tailor that shared the building with Treebeards when it first opened its doors in 1978. Within a building that’s been standing since the 1870s, Treebeards may be hosting more than just customers at their southern cooking cafe.

Consider helping me deliver more content: https://www.patreon.com/imarrowsj

Entrance

Gator

Staircase

Above Art

Upstairs Bar

Barkeep

© John Marrows All Rights Reserved

Constructed in 1926, the Julia Ideson Building located at 500 McKinney stands across from downtowns Main Branch Library in Houston, Texas. Although checking out a book would regularly be on my itinerary while visiting the library, rumors of a past caretaker and his dog’s spirit roaming the grounds are what sparked my team and I’s interest.

Caretaker Jacob Frank Cramer and his German Shephard companion Petey, have been said to be seen roaming the library grounds during their nightly rounds. Sounds of Peteys nails clicking across the tile floor has been enough to keep some believers away from this historical Texas building.

“Unfortunately, we cannot confirm that HPL has a resident ghost – even though we joined Houston Chronicle staff last year in a ghost-hunting exercise. We trekked the halls of the Julia Ideson Building into the wee hours of the night, searching for any sign of Mr. Cramer or Petey. Sadly, we didn’t turn up a single note, click or flash of light. But the legend continues.” – Sandra Fernandez, HPL public relations manager.

Consider helping me deliver more content: https://www.patreon.com/imarrowsj

Main Entrance

Side View

Side Door

Front Sign

Texas Historical Mark

© John Marrows All Rights Reserved

Constructed in 1885 within the heart of Austin, the Texas State Capitol Building stands valiantly atop a hill. Monuments scatter the grounds, with a historical museum and gift shop off to the side. Tours are offered to those seeking a more traditional travel experience. However, rumors of spirits that haunt the grounds and building itself are what brought my team and I to the Texas State Capitol Building.

Murdered in his first-floor office in 1903, Comptroller Robert Marshall Love has been reportedly seen walking up the promenade of the Texas Capitol Building. You may see him wandering the grounds towards the capitol entrance on a misty morning sporting a top hat and coat tails.

An unidentified politician once held secret trysts in a stairwell located on the third floor. His lover, an unknown woman in red, has been spotted by cleaning crews in his third-floor office but vanishes as they turn the corner attempting to approach her. This section of the capitol is not open to the public.

In 1983, despite the heroic efforts of Austin firefighters, a 23-year-old man burned to death in a fire within the capitol walls causing severe damage to the East Wing. Rumor states that however many times you clean the window, handprints appear on the glass when the humidity is high. The very same window firefighters failed to break open in attempts to free the man trapped inside.

Consider helping me deliver more content: https://www.patreon.com/imarrowsj

Texas Capitol Building Cover Unedited

Front Yard

Main Lobby

Ceiling

© John Marrows All Rights Reserved

Against fair warning from locals in 1839, Gideon White decided to build a home in proximity to Shoal Creek. After three years of residency, Gideon was reportedly murdered by passing Native Americans. Once his corpse was discovered, the remains and shallow graves of many more were uncovered in the surrounding area. The majority of the graves were victims of yellow fever and cholera. Reports of unusual noises, cold spots, and vanishing apparitions are common from those who wander through this scenic running and biking route. Authorities claim pedestrians are not permitted on the trail after 10:00PM due to the amount of activity reported.

Consider helping me deliver more content: https://www.patreon.com/imarrowsj

Historical Marker

Creek One

Creek Two

Creek Three

Sewer Hole

Boulder Seating

© John Marrows All Rights Reserved

Once thriving in the early 20th century as a cotton shipping center for the central Texas area, Bartlett now stands mostly baron. Most of the buildings hold some sort of historical significance as the early 1900’s storefront remains on the main road. Approximately 1,600 residents reside in Bartlett scattered around the outskirts only driving into town to pass through. Split between Bell and Williamson counties, Bartlett is known to locals as “the best little town in Texas”.

My team and I were surprised to see some of the aging, vacant storefronts still in search for renters. Although this portion of town seems to be abandoned, Bartlett fights to stay on the map. Many events are still held throughout the year including an Old Town Festival and Antique & Collectible Auctions. If you happen to be passing through, my team and I highly recommend visiting this piece of Texas history!

Consider helping me deliver more content: https://www.patreon.com/imarrowsj

Town Entrance

Storefront One

Storefront Two

Storefront Three

Back Alley

Storefront GUNS

Town Exit

© John Marrows All Rights Reserved