The Hewitt House in Granger, Texas. As seen on Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003). Originally standing on the current grounds of the University of Texas, this architectural piece of horror film history moved to Granger, Texas in the 1930s. Current residents assure visitors and fans of the films that no one was murdered at this house. No Trespassing signs are posted around the gated entrance with a flyer stating they “do not offer tours, nor can you come closer to take photos”, but encourages guests to take photos from the road.

NOTE: “This is a working farm and people do live here.” If you’re a fan of the films and are planning a visit, please be respectful of the grounds and the family that lives there.

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This historic mansion in Texas was built in 1895 and rumored to be home to the spirit of a young girl. Dawning an old-fashioned dress, the young lady has been seen staring out the bay windows of the first floor. An apparent suicide has also been rumored in the upstairs nursery. Arriving at night on this residential street, my team and I were able to capture a few photos of the exterior while quickly roaming the grounds. Peeking inside the windows from the porch, we only found antique furniture and a grandfather clock.

Once home to a blacksmith and hardware merchant F.W. Schuerenberg, this was the second location marked by the Texas Historical Commission on my journey through the lone star state. Later research uncovered the great grandchild of F.W. Schuerenberg claimed that her father “…Schuerenberg Joseph Marek lived in this house while growing up and never heard stories about happenings. My father died, suicide not in Texas, when I was 13.” She states. “Had contact with my aunt and visited this house and asked questions about family but no comments about ghost.” She goes on to say here: F.W. Schuerenberg House Haunted History

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This abandoned farmhouse in central Texas was an unplanned pit stop, but definitely worth the exploration. Locals rumored satanic rituals and “sinful behaviors” happening at this location. Upon further investigation the only sin we could see is a few beer bottles littered around the property. Classic shag carpets were torn up from the floorboards and a deteriorating structure was all to be found. If anything, the lack of graffiti and vandalism was disturbing in its own way. We left only footprints behind in this forgotten shack somewhere deep within the lone star state.

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Pull out your holy water because this abandoned church in central Texas definitely possessed my interest. The cemetery with well-dated plots and unmarked burial sites surrounded this structure with the faded message of “Help Restore Me” painted on the front wall. A cultish altar draped with red shag carpets overlooked limited rows of pews covered in dust and cobwebs. What made this even more unnerving was the vintage Halloween decorations laid out on the pews in the back.

A historical marker from the Texas Historical Commissions posted on the grounds reads as follows: “Pioneer area settlers organized the Mt. Zion Baptist Church in 1852 on land donated by James R. Hines. Early ministers included notable Baptist leaders from Old Baylor College at nearby Independence. The church building was dismantled and rebuilt in the new town of Burton on land donated by F. A. Rice and A. Groesbeck in 1882. At that time the congregation was renamed Burton Baptist Church. The sanctuary was rebuilt after being damaged in the 1900 storm and on Feb. 18, 1983, it was moved here to its original site. It now serves as a reminder of the area’s rich pioneer heritage.”

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Exploration of the Elk River Public School that was abandoned in the early 1980s. Former site of the Potlatch Sawmill, this tiny logging community once flourished as a small American town. With a population of 847 in 1920, nearly 100 years later, the now minuscule population of 125 remain. Locals seemed welcoming to outsiders that come for the hunting seasons and snowmobile trails during the heavy winters. The school remains standing with rumors of haunted hallways and possible spirits that wander aimlessly within these open doors. My team and I explored this beautiful piece of history to find a special surprise at the top of the bell tower. A letterbox that inspired the short story of the same name. If you haven’t already, check out the horror short story here: Letterbox

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Classroom 2nd Floor

Front Entryway

Bell Tower Ladder

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The Bovill Cemetery in Latah County, Idaho. Within the dense wilderness of northern Idaho sits a lonesome cemetery for the small mountain town of Bovill. Even with an unconventional entrance off a winding mountain road, this had to be the most peaceful, and scenic resting spot I’ve ever encountered. Atop a massive hill, few plots and unmarked graves overlook the seemingly endless rows of gorgeous pines. A gentle wind brushed the snow around whistling between the branches. Most headstones were either outdated by decades, even centuries, or shared surnames with multiple others. The Bovill Cemetery was an unplanned, yet pleasant stop on my travels through Idaho. 

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Old Narrow Gauge Trail in the Randolph Forest. Witnesses claim to have heard voices calling out to them, even screaming at them. With small sightings of orbs, flashes, and dark shadows, this walking trail was a must stop on my travels through Maine. Locals state “Bicycle Larry” was killed and buried by the brook alongside this trail after police recovered a voicemail confession sent from the murderer to his sister. The killer later committed suicide and the remains of Bicycle Larry were never found. My team and I found nothing but odd remains of old toys amongst the lush green forestry and tires alongside the beautiful brook.

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The Bowdoin Cemetery in the Pit. A young woman in the 1800s allegedly practiced witchcraft and was sentenced to death by hanging from the townspeople in the Bowdoin area. This cemetery is unmarked and easily passed alongside the back Maine road it resides upon. Buried around a circle of trees it seemed even nature itself was afraid of what may lay below the soil. Many of the cemetery plots were destroyed, however, what frightened my team the most was not the mass amount of vandalism, but the alleged witch’s grave itself. The soil was soft and seemed turned as if someone recently was digging to find her corpse. If local legends are true, her grave has a curse attached to those who step in, and especially dig into, the burial site. The Bowdoin cemetery was definitely an eerie, and interesting stop on my journey through Maine.

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Witch Plot

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The North Manchester Meeting House. Built in 1793 this church still serves the small town of Manchester, ME. However, the building itself brings less attention than the cemetery surrounded by old stone walls. Within one of these stones, imprints what’s known as The Devil’s Footprint. Further investigating its origin, locals claim during the construction of the church a worker stood atop this stubborn boulder swearing he’d sell his soul to the devil if that rock could be moved. The next day, the rock was moved and the construction worker had disappeared. Upon arrival, it took a few minutes to find the aforementioned imprint. After combing the quiet and vacant cemetery grounds we finally found the stone. It’s impressive how much it resembled a human foot, just much larger in stature.

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The Devils Footprint

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Built in 1892 by Montreal based Roman Catholic organization, Sisters of Providence, the St. Ignatius Hospital served eastern Washington until 1964 upon the opening of Whitman Community Hospital. The facility employed nurses and functioned as an assisted living home until 2000, then was officially shut down and abandoned in 2003. In recent years the hospital was opened for public tours after rumors of being haunted and was even featured in an episode of Paranormal Lockdown with Nick Groff. Unfortunately for us, the facility was on full lockdown, boarded windows and doors, and ‘No Trespassing’ signs posted around the building. The tours offered are sold out and there’s no contact information on the current groundskeepers listed on the website. Enter at your own risk.

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Outside

Typewriter

Debri

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