Top 3 Haunted Places in Maine

Top 3 Haunted Places in Maine

Grab a lobster roll with your friends and cruise through the dense Maine wilderness. If you’re looking for more of an adventure away from the traditional tourist traps of Maine, be sure to add the following locations to your road trip itinerary.

DISCLAIMER: Remember to receive proper permission before entering buildings or facilities that are clearly marked as private property.

The Bowdoin Cemetery in the Pit

A young woman in the 1800s allegedly practiced witchcraft and was sentenced to death by hanging from the townspeople in the Bowdoin area. This cemetery is unmarked and easily passed alongside the back Maine road it resides upon. Buried around a circle of trees it seems even nature itself is afraid of what may lay below the soil. Many of the cemetery plots are destroyed, however, what frightens most explorers, is not the mass amount of vandalism, but the alleged witch’s grave itself. The soil is soft, almost freshly turned, as if someone recently was digging to find her corpse. If local legends are true, her grave has a curse attached to those who step in, and especially dig into, the burial site. The Bowdoin cemetery is definitely an eerie, and interesting stop for your next journey through Maine.

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The North Manchester Meeting House

Constructed in 1793, this church still serves the small town of Manchester, ME. However, the building itself brings less attention than the cemetery surrounded by old stone walls. Within one of these stones, imprints what’s known as The Devil’s Footprint. Locals claim during the construction of the church a worker stood atop this stubborn boulder swearing he’d sell his soul to the devil if that rock could be moved. The next day, the rock was moved and the construction worker had disappeared. It’s easy to miss the inexplicable imprint while combing the quiet and vacant cemetery grounds. The legend of ‘The Devil’s Footprint’ is one to worth viewing on your next Maine road trip.

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The Central Maine Sanatorium

Originally titled ‘The Chase Memorial Sanatorium’, it opened in 1910 as a hospital to treat tuberculosis patients. As the rate of tuberculosis cases rose, so did the need for treatment. Extending the intimate hospital setting, construction of wooden buildings took place in 1912 but was unfortunately lost in a fire one year later. The hospital quickly bounced back rebuilding with the addition of a surgical wing and children’s unit.

At the time, there were three Maine (pun not intended) treatment centers for patients with tuberculosis. Western Maine Sanatorium, Central Maine Sanatorium, and Northern Maine Sanatorium. In more southern regions of the state, patients who seemed to be responding to treatment and were more likely to be cured were admitted or transferred to Western Maine Sanatorium in Hebron, ME. Otherwise, they remained or were transferred to Central Maine Sanatorium in Fairfield, ME. In northern regions of the state patients with tuberculosis were admitted to the Northern Maine Sanatorium in Presque Isle, ME. The Central Maine Sanatorium closed in 1970 with a portion of its rooms remaining open as the Pleasant Hill Nursing Home eventually closing in 2001.

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If you’re looking for more be sure to follow me on Instagram @iMarrowsJ or check out my page on Haunted History. Did I miss something? Contact Me or comment below.

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